HOW TO PRONOUNCE ‘CAN’

HOW TO PRONOUNCE ‘CAN’

The phonetic transcription of the individual word can looks as follows /kæn/. However, in rapid speech, when it is not stressed, can would be pronounced with schwa /kən/. The strong form /kæn/ is used in the final position in a sentence, e.g. I suppose I can /kæn/. schwa | szwa, nazwa samogłoski w języku angielskim zapisywanej jako əCzytaj dalej …
Spend 365 (and more!) days having fun with the English Matters 2021 Calendar Edition

Spend 365 (and more!) days having fun with the English Matters 2021 Calendar Edition

  Dear Readers, this time we've prepared something special for you. 365 exercises,fact files, jokes, drawings and other interesting stuff that will help you improve your English every day. Below you'll find two examples from the new EM Calendar Special Edition.   1. Good & Goodness Underline the phrases with a positive meaning.   I was over the moon. I cried my eyes out when I discovered I’d failed the exam. She looked down in the mouth. Do you know what happened? I couldn’t stop grinning from ear to ear. My heart sank…Czytaj dalej …
Bright colour  /braɪk kʌlər/ !  What happens when you speak fast?

Bright colour /braɪk kʌlər/ ! What happens when you speak fast?

Assimilation is a phenomenon which does not refer solely to the English language. It is a characteristic feature of natural, rapid speech. Owing to assimilation, phonemes that are not in isolation are pronounced differently than those in isolation, for instance ‘t’ transforms into ‘p’ as in meat pie /miːp paɪ/ or ‘t’ can become ‘k’ as in bright colour /braɪk kʌlər/. In other words, the neighbouring sounds become similar to each other.   Elision occurs when some sounds are omitted in casual speech. Vowels, consonants as well as whole syllables can be elided. There are a lot of examples of…Czytaj dalej …
How to Speak with Received Pronunciation

How to Speak with Received Pronunciation

From language of the wealthy, to pronunciation taught in private school, Received Pronunciation gets a mixed reception in the UK. Whether you love it or hate it, you’re bound to have heard it. Received Pronunciation could be considered both common and completely uncommon. It is usually the standard of pronunciation that would be included in a dictionary and is that which most speakers of English as a second language would aspire to use. Moreover, given its historical prevalence in British media, many people assume it is the most widely spoken accent in Britain – this is not the case. For a while, Received Pronunciation (RP)…Czytaj dalej …
Practise English with Your Children

Practise English with Your Children

Can non-English parents significantly contribute to their children’s knowledge of the language?* Does it require much preparation? Is it very difficult? English Matters  answers those questions and serves up some readymade solutions, as well as describes a few tricks of the trade. Although English is a foreign language, activities that you can use to practise English with your own child will not be totally different from those you use in your mother tongue. All children are taught to recite nursery rhymes or chants, and sing songs in their native language. So, why not make use of the abundant source of English rhymes and songs? Sing, read and recite with your…Czytaj dalej …
Golden Californians

Golden Californians

Since its early days, California, also called the Golden State, has always attracted people from all over the world in search of fame and fortune. According to the ranking of the 400 wealthiest Americans prepared by the Forbes business magazine every year, about 25% of US billionaires call California their home, and many of them reside in the Los Angeles area.  Being open to immigration, along with the huge size of the state itself, and the sheer number of innovative companies, institutions and investors in tech hubs like Silicon Valley, provides an explanation as to why so many great fortunes have been built here. A unique combination of highly-skilled workers,…Czytaj dalej …
Moving Around Town

Moving Around Town

Everyone in today’s world travels. We need English, or another foreign language if we go somewhere abroad. It is sometimes necessary to talk to local people and ask them for directions to a place we want to visit. It can also happen that somebody asks you about a place in your home town. Would you like to help this person, but you can’t? Let’s change that! It’s possible to feel comfortable when you use English to move around town!   Places in a City Let’s start with the basic vocabulary for the places in a city which you need…Czytaj dalej …
Practise English with English Matters:)

Practise English with English Matters:)

  Complete the sentences with these words: jumps, tooth, new, away, pop, wind, time, door, up, middle: 1. He’s seriously ill – at death’s ______. 2. She never hurries – she always takes her ______. 3. We live in the __________ of nowhere. 4. She loves cakes – she has a sweet _______. 5. They ran after him but he managed to get ____. 6. When your partner doesn’t speak to you, you know something’s ____. 7. When she took the medicine she felt like a ____ woman. 8. He ran like the…Czytaj dalej …
Screen Inventions

Screen Inventions

tanorexic – unable to tan (comes from Jersey Shore) truthiness – belief that something must be true or right because it feels right. A belief which is not based on facts or any logical evidence (comes from: The Colbert Report) shamazing – shazam + amazing; awesome, amazing, great (comes from: The X Factor USA) mockumentary – mock + documentary; a film or TV programme having the form of a documentary whose subject materials are fictional (example: The Office) mind-meld – telepathic link of minds enabling two or more individuals to exchange their thoughts (comes from: Star Trek)   Interested in more titbits…Czytaj dalej …
50 Tips to Speak English Better

50 Tips to Speak English Better

1. Learn conversation fillers. Even the best speakers occasionally need a moment to collect their thoughts. In such situations, native speakers of English use conversational place holders such as: • um… • ah… • well,… • Let me think. • so,… • I guess… • er… • I suppose… • You mean… • I mean… • basically,.. • like... • You know… • ok… • literally… • actually… • right… • I see • hold on • Let’s see. • To be honest • As a matter of fact • I was just thinking… 2. In order to be an effective speaker of English, you need to be an effective listener…Czytaj dalej …